“To say that the head of the state will come and talk to these terrorists, I don’t think that is going to happen,” Army chief general Bipin Rawat said.

Army chief general Bipin Rawat on Monday said there was little possibility of direct talks between the government and separatists or terrorists in Kashmir, but they could approach the interlocutor, Dineshwar Sharma, who had been appointed for the purpose.

“To say that the head of the state will come and talk to these terrorists, I don’t think that is going to happen,” Rawat told reporters at Mamun cantonment in Punjab’s Pathankot after a seminar.

“If you look at the government policy, we have got a very clear cut policy — that we will not allow terrorists to create violence in our society and therefore anybody who creates violence will be neutralized,” he said.

“At the same time, an interlocutor has been tasked by the government to speak to various people in the Valley. I don’t understand as to what they are trying to say. Sharma is moving around talking to people. He is saying that I am open to everybody and anybody who wants to speak to me can come to me. Who says talks are not going on?” he asked.

After India said it was sending non-officials to participate in Afghanistan peace talks that also had Taliban representatives, former Jammu and Kashmir chief minister Omar Abdullah had asked why the Narendra Modi government couldn’t have a “non-official” dialogue with non-mainstream stakeholders in the troubled state.

When asked about this, the Army chief said, “If separatists don’t want to approach the interlocutor, then I don’t know what further can be hoped”.

“We are doing indirect talks to see we can approach the stakeholders and send a clear message to them. But to say that the head of the state will come and talk to these terrorists, I don’t think that is going to happen,” he said.

“If people do not behave and continue the violence, the only element left is to neutralize them,” he said.

On Punjab, he said that the Centre has initiated action against external forces trying to revive insurgency in Punjab.

Punjab saw one of the worst phases of insurgencies in the 1980s during the pro-Khalistan movement, which was eventually quelled by the government.

VNAP News Portal